High Protein Waffles

This waffle recipe has fast become a favorite at our house. I love it because it is a healthy soaked whole grain, gluten free*, full of protein start to the day. My husband and children love it because you would never know that it is healthy, gluten free, or full of protein; it just tastes light and delicious.

12-24 hours before: soak 1 cup organic rolled oats in 3/4 cup whey (or 1 cup yogurt if you don’t have just whey). This should be done at room temperature or warmer, in a glass bowl, covered with a clean dish towel.

Morning of: in blender, mix together 4 large eggs (I use duck eggs, so if you have medium sized eggs, bump it up to 5 eggs) and 1/2 cup cottage cheese. Add soaked oats, and blend until oat pieces have been ground smooth. Blend in 2 tsp. non-aluminum baking powder, and 1/2 tsp. fine sea salt.

Pour from blender pitcher into a hot waffle iron. Remove when cooked, and enjoy with butter and organic grade B maple syrup. Or, if you’re sending breakfast out the door with someone, you can make two breakfast sandwiches from a waffle by layering a fried egg and filleted cooked chicken sausage between two quarters of waffle drizzled lightly with syrup. Mmm . . . yummy either way.

Yields 5 round “Belgian” waffles. Each waffle has 12 gms. of protein.

Note: The best way to do this recipe is with 24 hours prep, so the oats are nourishing you without stealing minerals from your body.  (Unsoaked grains, legumes, and nuts have a great deal of phytic acid -which human digestion can’t handle as well as ruminants- which actually steals important minerals, like calcium, from our bodies!). You can read more about this in this article from the Weston A. Price Foundation: Be Kind to Your Grains and They Will Be Kind to You.

However, if you’re in a hurry, or forget to soak the night before (as often happens to me!), then skip the yogurt/whey and increase the cottage cheese to 1 cup. Still just as delicious, and high in protein. And then start the soaking habit next time.

Get more tips on this recipe and see pictures on soaking oats here.

*Oats do not intrinsically have Celiac-causing-gluten in them, however, many oats are contaminated with gluten from other grains. If you have Celiac Disease, it is always wise to choose only Certified Gluten Free Oats.

You may also enjoy the ideas in Breakfast: Off to a Great Start.

0 thoughts on “High Protein Waffles

  1. Wow that sounds so delicious! We love waffles at our house, and I always make the Joy of Cooking recipe but this sounds like a healthy alternative (no 2 sticks of butter here!)

    When you say soak the oats in yogurt, is that just plain yogurt or something special? Thanks!

    1. Pat & Liz,

      You can soak the oats in either whey (it’s that yellowish liquid that separates from yogurt or cottage cheese), or in plain yogurt. It is necessary to choose a quality yogurt which will state that there are “live active cultures” in the yogurt. Nancy’s is a great brand, as are many of the choices at Trader Joes or Whole Foods Market.

      The acidic, live culture is able to break down the phytic acid in the oats, making them more digestible, as well as removing this “anti-nutrient” (unsoaked grains, legumes, and nuts actually steal important minerals -like calcium- from our bodies!). You can read more about this on this article from the Weston A. Price Foundation: http://www.westonaprice.org/food-features/497-be-kind-to-your-grains.html

      Thanks for the question! Enjoy!
      ~Bronwyn

  2. Waffles are not common in my country in which the staple food is rice. Waffles are usually consumed for snacks which means we like to eat them after the big meals. Thanks for the recipe:-)

    1. Jim,

      Oats do not intrinsically have Celiac-causing-gluten in them, however, many oats are contaminated with gluten from other grains. If you have Celiac Disease, it is always wise to choose only Certified Gluten Free Oats (available from Bob’s Red Mill).

      ~Bronwyn

    1. Postcard,

      Hope you’re enjoying your waffles!

      In terms of carbs, this is not a “low carb” recipe: the oats have 67 gms of carbs, the yogurt about 10 gms, and the cottage cheese about 3 gms. Eggs have virtually none. Altogether that is 80 carbs for the batch of 5 waffles: 16 carbs per waffle.

      However, since the oats are soaked (soured really, like making sourdough) for 24 hours, there is good reason to believe that the carb load has been reduced some in feeding the probiotics in the culture. Also, the oats have 10 gms of fiber, which is often subtracted from the total carb count. If desired, you can skip the yogurt and increase the cottage cheese to 1 cup, but it is difficult to soak with cottage cheese, so I don’t advise it.

      Additionally, as a hypoglycemic, I have found that I feel better when I have a blend of protein, fat, and whole food carbs in a meal. The high amount of protein (and fat if you use butter on top!) actually helps to slow the quick uptake of sugars from the meal, thereby avoiding blood glucose swings. Of course, follow the recommendation of your doctor!

      To health and food happiness!
      ~Bronwyn

    1. Hope,

      Thanks for the question. You can soak the oats in either whey (it’s that yellowish liquid that separates from yogurt or cottage cheese), or in plain yogurt. It is necessary to choose a quality yogurt which will state that there are “live active cultures” in the yogurt. Nancy’s is a great brand, as are many of the choices at Trader Joes or Whole Foods Market. I haven’t checked Walmart recently, but they may carry a plain style yogurt with live cultures.

      The acidic, live culture is able to break down the phytic acid in the oats, making them more digestible, as well as removing this “anti-nutrient” (unsoaked grains, legumes, and nuts actually steal important minerals -like calcium- from our bodies!). You can read more about this on this article from the Weston A. Price Foundation: http://www.westonaprice.org/food-features/497-be-kind-to-your-grains.html

      Because it makes it ultra cheap, I buy my organic rolled oats in a 25 lb. sack through a natural food co-op (Azurestandard.com here in the West). However, any rolled oats will work in this recipe (Walmart is sure to have Quaker Oats!).

      As much as I can (time-wise or budget-wise) I try to source organic foods for my family. I often find ways to get organic for less than conventional prices! (Woo-Hoo!) It does take some effort, but I know it’s worth it to protect my kids from the chemicals, pesticides, and GMOs which seem to be affecting children in increasingly damaging ways. But I know how daunting it can be to try to make healthy changes in our homes (“where do I begin?”), and that’s why I started this blog: to help moms begin to make positive changes. Two of my posts which might interest you are:

      Breakfast: Off to a Great Start http://cleangreenstart.wordpress.com/2010/01/05/breakfast-off-to-a-great-start/

      The Shopping Habit
      http://cleangreenstart.wordpress.com/2010/05/18/the-shopping-habit/

      Enjoy the waffles!
      ~Bronwyn

  3. This looks so great! I love starting my morning with protein. I have Celiac’s disease, so I’ve been buying a gluten-free frozen brand. I will have to try this recipe soon! Thanks for sharing. 🙂

    1. Allergic,

      I have added a note to the post, clarifying that those with Celiac Disease should definitely choose Certified Gluten Free Oats (I know they are available from Bob’s Red Mill brand).

      I have not been diagnosed with Celiac, but I consider myself “gluten intollerant.” After my sister was diagnosed with gluten intolerance, I decided to go off of it and see what happened with my autoimmune disease (Hashimoto’s Hypothyroidism) and my gut issues. After 6 months, my gut had finally healed, and my autoimmune disease is in complete remission. For me, this is amazing.

      And, with waffles these good, who needs gluten, right? 🙂

      As a side note, I’ve been making my own variation on the Gluten Free Boule on artisanbreadinfive.com. As a dough that sits in the fridge and can become bread, pizza dough, hamburger buns, flatbread, etc. within a few hours of dinner time, it has revolutionized (freed?) my cooking! (And it tastes way better than the gluten free mixes or frozen products I’ve tried.) I’ll post my variations on my blog sometime, but I highly recommend the artisan bread site to you!

      Enjoy!
      ~Bronwyn

  4. Here’s another option- use any combination of whole grains/gluten free you want,

    AND separate the eggs and whip the whites into stiff peaks.

    Then fold them in. It makes them really light and light and yummy.

    I don’t bother soaking the oats overnight. Oats can also be pulverized in blender to act more like flour.

    1. Raisingable,

      Thanks for the comment! Great idea about using the rising power of those eggs!

      Soaking the oats overnight isn’t necessary for this recipe, but it does make it a healthier waffle. I added a note to the post which explains a little about why it’s a good idea to soak our grain, nuts, and legumes when we can.

      ~Bronwyn

    1. LOL! I’m not sure whether to take that as:

      “something this yummy that is healthy will allow everyone to shape up their diet and enjoy it”

      OR

      “if everyone eats this, they’ll give up food”

      Hopefully the former! 🙂
      ~Bronwyn

  5. I have celiac disease and not allowed any gluten, these waffles sound great. Celiac is not a death sentence just a pain in the digestive tract. I found it also causes stomach bloating (I thought I was just fat), after staying away from gluten my tummy went down and I don’t feel that bloating feeling after I eat.
    Gluten is found in many food items, mostly bread, pasta, cereal. It’s not easy to cut all that out of your diet, but try it for one week and at the end of the week you will be so surprised, the way you feel and deflation of the tummy is a good feeling in itself.

    1. Cathy,

      I have added a note to the post, clarifying that those with Celiac Disease should definitely choose Certified Gluten Free Oats (I know they are available from Bob’s Red Mill brand).

      I have not been diagnosed with Celiac, but I consider myself “gluten intollerant.” After my sister was diagnosed with gluten intolerance, I decided to go off of it and see what happened with my autoimmune disease (Hashimoto’s Hypothyroidism) and my gut issues. After 6 months, my gut had finally healed, and my autoimmune disease is in complete remission. For me, this is amazing.

      And, with waffles these good, who needs gluten, right? 🙂

      As a side note, I’ve been making my own variation on the Gluten Free Boule on artisanbreadinfive.com. As a dough that sits in the fridge and can become bread, pizza dough, hamburger buns, flatbread, etc. within a few hours of dinner time, it has revolutionized (freed?) my cooking! (And it tastes way better than the gluten free mixes or frozen products I’ve tried.) I’ll post my variations on my blog sometime, but I highly recommend the artisan bread site to you!

      Enjoy!
      ~Bronwyn

  6. Btw, I forgot to ask, can I use only 4 egg whites instead of the whole eggs? Also what is non aluminum baking powder? Is it different from regular baking powder?

    1. Jos,

      Yes: non-aluminum baking powder is made without aluminum, and will state this on the package. Most baking powder has aluminum in it; and aluminum has been linked to Alzheimer’s Disease, so it’s not something we want in our bodies!

      I have never tried to make this recipe with egg whites only. If you need to do this, I would think that you would need more than 4 eggs worth. However, the egg yolks are some of the only fat in this recipe, so it may change it significantly, maybe make it stick to the pan more?

      Since I am feeding growing children in my family, I always use “whole” foods: whole eggs, whole milk, whole yogurt, etc. (not to mention whole grains and veggies). Children need quality saturated fat to develop healthy nervous systems (among other things!). Egg whites do have protein in them, but the bulk of the nutrients are in the yolk of an egg. Plus, saturated fats are very stable, so it’s OK to cook with them, whereas vegetable fats are fragile, and should only be consumed non-heated (cold pressed).

      This can be a very confusing topic, since sadly there are a lot of food lobbies out there paying for “studies” to show why this or that denatured food is “good” for us. I love being able to check out long term anthropological studies on the Weston A. Price Foundation site: westonaprice.org.

      Best of health to you!
      ~Bronwyn

  7. What a great healthy alternative to the store bought frozen waffles that I am ashamed to admit I do buy… I am going to try these this weekend!! Thanks for the recipe!

  8. Thanks so much for the info on grains … I’ve always soaked my oats overnight but didn’t know why … the link was really interesting, and your recipe looks yummy!

  9. i’m going to try this over the weekend – i’m always on the lookout for healthier recipes.
    many thanks!

  10. Wow! waffles, so hungry now. I’ll have to venture into the kitchen, fighting my way through the cobwebs and dust, and see if I have any fresh food to make these delectable goodies.

  11. Just looking at the picture make me hungry. Isn’t that awesome to eath healthy and have fun while cooking? I see that you really like this part of the house. Also my favorite…the food. I’m glad you share this with us. Have fun finding more healthy stuff. We would be waiting!
    Blessings.
    ~Great Love to You,
    Mirian from peelingtheorange.

  12. OK Bronwyn, I’m going to try them tomorrow morning. Putting my GF oats to soak tonight. Anne has not been able to have GF oats for more than two years but she recently is able to tolerate them and it widens the horizons. I can’t put eggs in them because Anne is allergic, so I am going to try the flax seed substitute. I have had fantastic results with it in everything I have tried it in (much better than the egg substitute from EnerG). The waffles look so good that I really hope the substituting works. If it doesn’t I will make them properly, with eggs, for the rest of us! Thanks for the recipe.

    Kristi

    1. Kristi,

      I hope it works too!! The flaxseed substitute has worked well for me in other recipes too; I haven’t tried it in this one (I have a source for duck eggs and tolerate them well, so that’s my first choice).

      Let me know how it goes!
      ~Bronwyn

  13. thank you so much for this recipe! i made my first batch of waffles EVER today using this recipe. my teenagers LOVED them – said they were the best waffles they’d ever had! Please pat yourself on the back for me – to have three teens happy at breakfast eating the same meal is some sort of minor miracle in my book.

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