Brimful Store: Beautiful Toys

Last week I visited my talented friend, Kari, in her home. This is one of those friends who amazes you with how well she does everything, balancing family and an online business. Classy. Thinking. Desiring the best of everything for her family.

Of course I was eager to see in person the toys which I had previously only viewed in her online store Brimful. So in her cute garden shed-turned-home-business, she showed me her shop wares.

Wooden toys like this camera.

wooden camera

Or textile-art toys like this pear rattle:

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Wouldn’t you love to tie this natural teething ring on the top of a gift?

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Imaginatively illustrated baby-proof books. Yes. Chew-proof, drool-proof, rip-proof, and can even go in the tub.

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How about this ingenious pulling-rolling-stacking-sorting turtle toy?

Snail_Feature_1024x1024These beautiful hand made woolen dolls are whimsical and beg to be hugged.

 

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Raven2_1024x1024And here’s my favorite: the hysterically cute Dachshund Pull Toy, with leather connectors which enhance the natural, textural feel of the piece, and give it a gentle sway as it trots along behind a toddler.

Dog_Floppy_Ears_1024x1024Yes, please!

 

 

 

Trauma and Drama; Baby’s first week

Even after a great birth, there’s body-trauma to deal with. And even with a healthy, peaceful baby, there’s a little first-week drama to face. Here are a few things I found to help with both.

Bruising on upper chest (stripe from armpit to armpit where I leaned into the side of the tub): lavender essential oil applied directly to the skin. I did not dilute, and was not concerned about the proximity to breasts/nursing since this is indicated for mastitis as well.

Bruising on sacrum: PanAway* essential oil blend, applied neat. I felt that this not only helped with bruising of the bones, but that the absorbed oil helped to mend the pelvic floor muscles faster than in previous births.

Sore Upper Arms: PanAway* applied neat on location.

After Birth Pain: Cramp Bark tincture (alcohol) every few hours in first day, decreasing until 3rd day. I also used more of my Labor/Birth essential oil blend as a foot rub and low belly rub. I did not need to take Advil or any other synthetic pain killer.

Neck Misalignment/muscle discomfort from turning my head tubside during labor: Valor essential oil blend, on location.

General Exhaustion (birth is a marathon, afterall!): Frankincense oil on wrists, and inhaled. NingxiaRed wolfberry juice with essential oils (Young Living) and Chinese herbal tea (blended by my doctor) really helped me feel revived.

Water retention; drinking lots of water with lemon essential oil to help flush out excess fluid.

Tissue Soothing/Regeneration; Gentle Baby essential oil blend in peri bottle with water: 1 drop per peri bottle at each potty use.

Emotional Stability Post Partum: I used Ylang Ylang on wrists and inhaled. At ten days I began ProgessencePlus* serum which contains wild yam extract; 3 drops on forearms 2xday. I also began 1 drop Sclaressence* essential oil blend under tongue 2xday. I continued to take nutritional oils of flax, evening primrose, and fish for their omega 3 fatty acids.

Mastitis/clogged duct/engorgement: lavender and copaiba essential oils rubbed on site. Lavender is very effective alone, but copaiba magnifies it’s potency and is highly anti-inflammatory in its own right.

Baby

Belly Button: a drop of myrrh on the navel helped the belly button to heal and dry faster than my other babies. Works as an antiseptic.

Circumcision: a drop of myrrh in a dab of carrier oil at the base of the penis as an antiseptic. For pain, the “morphine bomb” worked wonders: I mixed 1 drop each Copaiba, Idaho Balsam Fir, and Frankincense in the palm of my hand and applied to baby’s feet and spine, and he was sleeping peacefully within 5 minutes (previous frantic pain).

Colic: in week 2 baby had a night of colic after too many feedings. Upon applying 1 drop of DiGize to his bloated belly in a clockwise pattern, he became calm and we all went back to sleep.

*Note: PanAway, ProgessencePlus, and Sclaressence essential oil blends contain a small amount of peppermint oil, which in large amounts some women find to reduce their milk supply. I have not found this to be the case with these blends, perhaps because it is such a small amount, or perhaps because the other oils in the blends support milk supply.

I only use Young Living essential oils for topical and internal use in my family. Please do your research about essential oils; I feel confident that Young Living EOs are the safest and most pure oils on the market, and have personally seen a difference in their potency as well. Please see my Essential Oils page for more information on purchasing a starter kit of Young Living essential oils.

Labor and Delivery

Ten days ago I gave birth to my sixth child. At 9lbs 8oz, he was my largest baby. Yet his birth was my best.

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Contrary to popular belief, it isn’t easy to give birth “once you get to number six.” 🙂 It is still labor. It is still transition, pushing, crowning, the whole works. But by this time I have learned how to work with my body, how to relax, and a few things to help the process.

This was my first birth using Essential Oils. (See my post on Labor and Birth for all the details!) I absolutely think they helped my labor to progress, my cervix to dilate, my pain to be decreased, my energy to not give out, and my emotions to stay stable and confident. I feel it was the oils that helped me avoid feeling out of control…the “I can’t do this!!” stage. I will be guest posting the details soon over at The OG Blog.

Additionally, having a caring supportive and highly qualified midwife from A Gentle Beginning, being able to spend transition and pushing in warm water (in the tub in my own bathroom), having my caring husband, mother, and for the first time, my oldest daughter on hand to support me, having a dark and calm environment…these all helped me to handle each contraction well.

Holding your new baby in your arms…the baby you just powerfully birthed…that is just about the pinnacle of life’s great moments!

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Essential Oils for Natural Labor and Childbirth

2014-03-30 00.21.23With 5 weeks to go until the due date of my 6th child, I’m all in “nesting mode”! Since I’m planning a home birth (my first 3 were in the hospital, my last two at home) with a licensed and highly trained midwife and team, part of my “nesting” includes pulling together supplies for the birth itself.

This will be the first birth in which I use essential oils therapeutically. In the past, I was just not aware of how powerful oils could be, so they did not figure into my birth plan. There is a wide range of purity and potency of oils; I will write about this sometime, but for now, know that I only recommend Young Living Essential Oils.

So after much information gathering, here is my current plan (subject to revision…I still have 5 weeks!). 🙂

Pregnancy: it’s important to recognize the power of oils; some oils used during labor are contraindicated during pregnancy, because their use is for supporting labor contractions, cervical dilation, and reducing pain sensation (through numbing or reducing fear/stress). Therefore, I will place an asterisk * after oils which I am avoiding touching/absorbing during pregnancy.

I am currently drinking daily a pregnancy tea with a base of Red Raspberry herb. This was blended for me by my sweet friend, Cara Lee, following the recipe on The Bulk Herb Store plus yellow dock. This is intended to tone the uterus in preparation for birth, without initiating labor.

I am also massaging my belly with almond oil, and 2 drops Gentle Baby. I add a little Idaho Balsam Fir because I love the layered scent! Its makes me feel calm…and French and expensive. 😉

Perineum Stretching
Because I have done perineum stretching using olive oil prior to birth, I have not had tearing of my perineum with any of my previous births (my largest baby was 9.6 lb). I am planning to do the same in the two weeks prior to my due date, but this time to include each time:

1 drop Gentle Baby

Once Labor Has Begun

Labor Oil Blend
I will use this topically on low belly, inside of ankles, and low back, starting with a few drops, increasing each hour if necessary.

8 drops helichrysum
6 drops copaiba
16 drops SclarEssence* (Clary Sage*, Peppermint, Spanish Sage*, Fennel*)10 drops ylang ylang
in an equal part base of almond oil

“Morphine Bomb”
This blend does not have any morphine in it, but taken in a capsule it has been known to give significant pain relief. I plan to use this early in my labor, before nausea may set in.

5 drops Copaiba
5 drops Frankincense
5 drops Idaho Balsam Firin a veggie capsule, ingested

Back Pain
Pan Away, pain relieving oil blend
(And of course, counter pressure from my husband. He’ll need PanAway on his arm muscles later…) 🙂

Nausea
Inhalation of:
Lemon or Peppermint

Energy Boost
I have a history of long labors, so I often eat some through the first part (can be days), but when it gets intense I don’t feel like eating. This can be hours, so I have 1 bottle (25 oz) of Ningxia Red juice from Young Living…it’s a natural energy drink (among its other uses) made with wolfberries and EOs, and the normal serving size is 1-2 oz. So that should get me through!

Baby
After our baby is born, I plan to use on his umbilicus (belly button)/cord:
1 drop Myrrh
On his back, feet, perhaps head:
1-3 drops Frankincense

Following Birth
For cramping:
tincture of Cramp Bark
tincture of St. Johns Wart
Morphine Bomb as needed
PanAway on lower belly as needed

Nursing
I plan to use this as needed to increase milk supply:1 drop Fennel under tongue

Note: I am not a doctor, and my birthplan does not constitute advice for your situation. I am not credentialed to diagnose, treat, or cure any disease. Please consult with your physician or trained midwife before developing your own birthplan.

 

What To Feed The Baby

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Question, via email:

I’m the one with Lucky baby that had such a hard time with formula [after a forced wean from breastmilk]. So he’s eating pretty much everything under the sun, except I don’t do any dairy. I tried some goats milk on him and he didn’t really seem to like it so just havent again. I’m confused on how to eat myself let alone make sure I’m giving him what his body needs at 13 months. Some sites say low protein high healthy fats, some say paleo for babies is best, etc. So I really like how healthy you and your family are, love following your blog and wondering if you could tell my what type of foods you fed your babies? I don’t know if they should be having coconut pancakes, rice flour, barely those type of grains. It seems like since I don’t know I feed him a lot of fruit and veggies.

My Answer: (I am not a licensed health care professional, and this is not health advice. Just my opinion.)

Hi friend! It can be confusing with so many opinions out there on diet and nutrition. I think coconut pancakes and fruits and veggies sound great, although you want to make sure he gets enough of the animal proteins/fats too since they are super-foods! He may disdain goats milk, but if you offered him raw cheese he may just love it!

There’s a lot to say on this subject; here are some principles I’ve used as guides for feeding my babies 10 months and up.

What’s good for you, is good for baby.

If you are pursuing a whole food, nutrient dense diet, then the foods which you haul in from the farmer, cook up in your crockpot, ferment on your counters, or bake in your oven are going to be excellent, nutrient dense choices for your child.

I don’t subscribe to the idea that baby food is something to be bought in small containers, have no resemblance to adult food, and be fed to a child at a different time of day than adults eat (although of course this happens occasionally). Someday (soon!) this tiny person will sit at the table with us and eat what we are eating, so why not get them used to the routine and the food while they are still in their high chair? Plus, the idea of cooking two different menus makes me want to cry.

Breastmilk is Best, as long as you can

I like to wait as long as possible before introducing food at all, and even water unless the weather turns hot. My babies have waited for their first bite of any food until between 8 and 10 months. I look for their cues on hunger/lip smacking/saliva. My last baby, a girl, was quite interested at 8 months, but my largest boy was barely interested at 10 months. Their hunger for food usually arrives about the time their first teeth do. There is some thought that waiting until this time to give foods can reduce allergic responses to food.

The first foods I give my babies are: egg yolk from a soft boiled/over easy egg, butter, liver pate (it’s cooked), cod liver oil, banana, avocado, as these are all soft and nutrient dense. After a few weeks of these foods, they are usually ready to try more flavors, so I begin to offer what we are eating.

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Egg yolk!

Waiting for molars. . . think soft foods

Dinner is our main meal, and there is nearly always something that baby can eat, and often she can eat all of it. I invested in a small baby food grinder years ago, the hand crank kind (portable!), which can be used to blend up soft foods like spaghetti with meat marinara, roasted chicken and broccoli, anything made in a crockpot, the chunky parts of soup (add back to broth), beans, rice, and most cooked veggies. It only takes a minute, and the child gets to experience those flavors which he has been smelling while dinner was cooking. He’s eating what mom and dad eat. He’s eating it fresh, and not frozen or canned. He’s eating food that tastes good, and if he rejects it on first or fifth try, you can be pretty confident that at some point he will love it like you do.

Some foods are hard for a baby to eat: salad, anything really chewy or crunchy. However, these foods are innately difficult to digest as well, so your diet should be filled with lots of other foods he is able to eat. That said, I will sometimes give baby a teeny tiny piece of lettuce with a homemade dressing on it. . . or the cranberry in the salad. . . or a feta crumble. I stick it right in their mouth and wait for the face. These are strong flavors, and I want the baby to experience them, along with some psychological coaching: “yum, yum, yum!” They are shocked, they spit, we all laugh.

If we are eating steak, I try to cook it medium rare, and then shave off very small pieces (no need for chewing) and feed them to baby. Yes, steak! My babies have loved this. I have also heard that indigenous mothers chew food for their babies, which begins to break down the foods with mom’s saliva enzymes, before transferring it to baby’s mouth.

We love taco salad; baby can eat the ground beef, beans, avocado, sour cream (if no reaction), tomatoes (if no reaction), cilantro, and lime.

Soups are messy, but we eat a lot of them in the winter, and if they have a bone broth base it’s awesome nutrition. We have a plastic pocket type bib which really helps contain the mess when spoon feeding baby, or the IKEA toddler smock which is full coverage for when baby feeds herself.

Good Fats = Good Brain

Brains, especially growing brains, need fat. Healthy, saturated fats. Besides water, that is what the brain is mostly comprised of, so it only makes sense that babies need a healthy dose of saturated fats daily for the significant growth of their gray matter.

Butter (grassfed/naturally yellow is best), avocado, egg yolk (soft boiled or over easy), coconut oil, nut butters, animal fats found with the meat, liver (organic animals) olive oil (cold pressed and uncooked), and heavy cream with or without the milk (raw from grassfed cows is best) are all great ways to feed baby’s developing brain, and keep baby satisfied for longer between meals (or at night!). Some of these are a meal or snack by themselves: egg yolk, liver, nut butter, avocado, ground meat. Others can be toppings for other foods: butter, coconut oil, olive oil.

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Butter!

Balancing Food Groups

We all need protein, and carbohydrates, and fats. Babies are no exception. I try to give my baby foods from each food group during a day, with a special emphasis on protein/fat at each meal. I personally feel better when I limit my sugars/starches, so my children’s diet roughly mimics my own, but they do eat more grains and fruits than I do.

In the US, toddler fare is universally offered as grain and sweets based. Look at any kids menu and you will see breads, pastas, crackers, fruit cups, sweetened dairy products, and downright candy as the leading act. Most foods marketed to/for kids fall into this category as well. Rather than rant about the lack of protein and fat, and the sugars that push kids toward addiction, set them up for diabetes or worse (OK, I just ranted), I’ll just advise: do not copy this diet in your home.

Do you feel better, have more energy and fewer ailments, sleep and perform exercise better, and feel more satisfied on mostly protein, mostly carbs, or somewhere in between? If you have never given this any thought, The Metabolic Typing Diet may help you (gives self-test checklists) to determine this for yourself. And have your spouse take the test too, as your child will likely pattern after one or both of you. Adoptive parents will have to watch carefully for mood/behavior in their baby following different meal ratios.

Depending on your metabolic type, you may feel better on more carbohydrates than I do in your diet, and your child is likely to do well with this diet as well. In this case, your healthy diet would contain more whole grain breads and porridge (soaked grains are best), starchy veggies like potato, yam, and corn, and fruits than mine does. But you should still be fighting the “goldfish at every snack” mentality for your child, since these are just not whole foods.

Regardless of how much of each food your baby eats, it is difficult to get a child to eat much of anything if they start off a meal with fruits, since those sugars are absorbed into their bloodstream quickly and their hunger signal turns off. It usually works better for me to serve “courses” starting with the protein/fat portion of the meal, and finishing with a few fruit pieces.

Allergies and Introductions: Every One is Unique

My husband and I have few allergies, but the few things which I am sensitive to (chicken eggs, cow dairy as a toddler) I have been wary of introducing too early to my children. I am also gluten intolerant, and after two of my children have tested positive as well, we have assumed it is hereditary and have put all our children on a gluten free diet.

Since every one is unique, watch for reactions when introducing the “common allergens” and acidic foods like tomato and some fruits. I’ve found that a baby may need to avoid a food, but a few months later they will be able to eat it without reaction. The most common reactions are loose stools and rashes at mouth or bottom. Vomiting, constipation, eczema, or histamine responses (swollen eyes, sneezing, difficulty breathing) are more severe reactions to a food, in which case it may be much longer before a child can handle that food again, if ever. You should contact your child’s doctor with a severe reaction, as follow-up testing may be advised.

One largely overlooked component to allergies is imbalance of intestinal flora. Babies usually have flora similar to mom’s, since they acquired their first dose from her in the birth canal and received daily probiotics in her milk. If you question your own gut health, or you/baby have a history of yeast or antibiotics, your baby may need some supplemental probiotics. I have used the Klaire Labs brand of Infant Formula probiotics. Homemade sauerkraut juice or yogurt are other ways to support baby’s intestinal flora.

Quality is Key

Eating an organic diet is expensive . . . but so is illness. Avoiding unnecessary chemicals on our foods is always a good idea, but even more crucial for the developing bodies of our children. Choose organic and grassfed whenever you find it and can budget it. Here is my prioritized list of foods to source organically, starting with oils and fats, and all animal products. Fruits and veggies are further down the list; you can download a free guide to the “Dirty Dozen” and “Clean Fifteen” on Enviromental Working Group’s site, or download a free app to your smart phone which will allow you to look up produce item by item while at the market.

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Roasted Veggies!

Meal Ideas: These are all foods my babies and toddlers actually eat.

Breakfast

  • Scrambled eggs with butter (can season with homemade sauerkraut juice), blueberries (this is a meal they can feed themselves)
  • Unsweetened goat yogurt (or drizzled with honey after 12 months), or kefir smoothie, whole grain bread with almond butter
  • Soaked oatmeal/honey/butter/raisins with finely sliced natural breakfast sausage on the side
  • Sweet Oven Souffle, cut into squares, grapefruit wedges
  • Protein waffles, butter (syrup is just too messy for babies!)

Lunch

  • Veggie soup made with bone broth, avocado and/or Creme Fraiche (whipping cream cultured with yogurt starter for 24 hours) on top, can add sauerkraut juice after it has cooled a little in the bowl (home fermented or Bubbies brand are alive with probiotics)
  • Grassfed hot dog link, finely sliced, small pear pieces, cooked carrot medalions (another self-feed meal)
  • Hummus with olive oil, dabs of liver pate or avocado, applesauce or pumpkin souflee
  • Canned tuna/salmon/chicken with homemade mayo and raisins, thawed or cooked peas on the side
  • Dinner leftovers

Add a large salad to any of the above, and you’ve answered what to feed yourself for lunch as well.

Snack

  • Slices of raw cheese and a few raisins or apple slices (portable)
  • Goat yogurt with honey drizzle
  • Glass of raw milk (goat best for many babies) and a homemade muffin with butter (whole grain or almond/coconut flour, can have carrots, zucchini, or fruit in it) (also somewhat portable)
  • Banana and almond butter (peanut butter if no reaction)

Dinner

  • What you are eating!

Baby Snacks

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With my first baby, I gave Cheerios to develop the “pincer” coordination. Nine years later, with my fifth baby, it’s organic raisins.

She began eating solids last month at eight months of age. Bone broth/veggie soup, egg yolk, avocado, and banana were the first foods…but she has liked everything I give her from our plates. She’s now getting about half her calories from breastmilk and the other half from food, I’m guessing. Happy and healthy!

Best. Pregnancy. Ever.

Louisa, born 11-20-11

I completed my fifth pregnancy just 11 weeks ago. I can truly say that it was my best pregnancy, birth, and postpartum. Considering that I am now in my 30’s, also caring for 4 other children, and this pregnancy was back-to-back with the previous one, that amazes me.

Although every pregnancy is unique for factors outside of our control (for example, I was not able to correlate more- or less-severe morning sickness with exemplary living), I did feel that the specific exercise and diet programs I followed in this pregnancy, particularly the last trimester, are what set it apart from the rest.

My previous baby (#4) was born at 9.6 pounds. He was not overdue. There were no complications during his birth, and he is completely healthy. However he was significantly more difficult to give birth to compared to my 7 and 8 pound babies. (And it hurt a lot.) So in pregnancy #5 I was motivated to do whatever it took to “build a smaller baby” as long as it would not harm my baby in any way.

Exercise

T-Tapp is an exercise program (developed by Teresa Tapp, hence the name) which puts you into alignment and activates the muscles for increased strength and flexibility. Although I had T-Tapped some throughout my 4th pregnancy, I really committed to doing the 15 minute basic workout 3 times each week in this fifth pregnancy. This gave me more energy, kept my lymph moving to avoid cellulite, strengthened my back to avoid back pain (even while sleeping) and helped keep my blood sugar in excellent ranges (avoiding an “over-big” baby).

A major motivator in keeping me on track with exercise was learning that I was chosen as a grand prize winner of the T-Tapp 30 day challenge (which I entered in Jan/Feb 2011) and would be attending (all expenses paid!) the Beauty Boot Camp retreat in Jan. 2012 put on by Teresa Tapp in Florida. The retreat was only 7 weeks after my baby was born, so I knew I had to exercise to the end of pregnancy to be able to tone up right away. I T-Tapped up until the day before labor started, then began some of the stretching exercises in week 5 postpartum, did the full 15 minute exercise in week 6, and was off to Florida in week 7 for the fitness retreat.

Diet

I followed the SCD (Specific Carbohydrate Diet) strictly from the middle of my sixth month up until a week before my due date, at which time I added back some complex carbs to “carb load” for labor. SCD is basically grain, sugar, and starch free…not even small amounts of lactose are allowed. Honey is allowed, and fruits, but those are the only sugars. This means you end up eating a lot of vegetables and meat, eggs and fruit. We also ate a lot of our own homemade (24 hour culture) yogurt and creme fraiche (like sour cream but even yummier), and zucchini and/or apple muffins made with almond flour.

My son’s doctor prescribed the diet as a way to improve his gut flora and absorption. However, I felt that my entire family may be able to benefit from it, and with all the work it would be I couldn’t see cooking two separate mealplans. So I put us all on it. (My husband ate grains at lunch away from home, and after a few weeks I began giving my 13 month old and 3 year old raw milk again.) My midwife had suggested avoiding carbohydrates as a way to have a smaller baby, and I felt that this diet was so packed with nutritious foods that it would be a good way to implement that idea.

The results?

I felt great.

My ending pregnancy weight was about 9 pounds less than the previous pregnancy (even though I began this pregnancy 5 pounds heavier than the previous, and I have more muscle than before, which is heavier).

In previous pregnancies I tested positive for Group B Strep, but my anti-microbial diet (SCD) along with GSE and probiotics was effective enough in altering my gut flora to the point that I tested negative at the end of this pregnancy (those of you who have tried to change the flora balance in your gut know how difficult this is…often taking years of effort).

And my baby was born at a lovely 7.8 pounds, even though she was 9 days over her due date.

Here’s a picture of me the week before my due date with my 5th pregnancy:

Full term, 2011

And here’s a photo at the end of my 4th pregnancy:

Full term, 2010

Although my 2010 pregnancy was good, my 2011 was great! Can’t you see that in the pictures?

Birth

I had my best labor and birth; much easier getting that 7 pounder out. This blog post is already way too long to launch into birth details…not that you were interested. 🙂

Postpartum

One thing I’ve learned after having 5 babies, is to take seriously the 6 week postpartum period. Stay in bed for the first week, then take it as easy as you possibly can. I was blessed to have many meals prepared for our family by friends and family. I decided to look on that as a blessing for REST, so I would take a nap in the afternoon when dinner was on it’s way. It would have been natural to me to clean house, do paperwork, or blog, but I MADE myself lay down. I’m glad I did. I needed it!

At 5 weeks postpartum I began stretches, and at 6 weeks began the 15 minute T-Tapp routine. Now a month later, I’ve been seeing my body tone up so much faster and easier than before. Louisa is just thriving; at her 6 week check up she was over 12 pounds, and she now sleeps 6-8 hours in the night. (Hallelujah!) She is solely breastfed.

Here’s a picture of me which my husband just snapped a few minutes ago (yeah, it’s not my favorite hair and makeup day, but I’m keeping it real).

11 weeks postpartum

Egg On His Face: Baby’s First Food

I’m introducing solids to my 7 month old baby this week. He has had nothing but breastmilk to this point (even water!) and I’d say he’s doing pretty well at 22 lbs. and wearing size 18 months.

Thad with egg yolk on his face.

 

On Monday I tried acorn squash (or is it an heirloom pumpkin?) which I baked, pureed, and froze in small containers last fall. Tasted pretty good to me, but Baby hated it. At least he just let it hang in his open mouth while drool dripped out. Next day I tried again, with the same reaction.

On Wednesday I gave him some veggies from our dinner: zucchini roasted with garlic, sea salt and olive oil. He loved it, even though I only mashed it with my fork.

On Saturday morning I tried soft egg yolk, and was surprised again that he loved it. He kept opening his mouth and “diving” for more. Although squash is a fine food to start on, I’m particularly happy about him going for egg yolk, as it is a super-food with excellent nutrients and essential fats, especially for brain development. And since I use duck eggs (because of an allergy I have to chicken eggs) the yolk has B12 in it as well.

Egg yolk (raw or soft cooked) is the recommended first food for babies in the Nourishing Traditions cookbook.

The easiest way to feed soft egg yolk to an infant is to soft boil the egg, then scoop out only the yolk to feed him.

Cloth Diapering Myths Debunked


My first two children spent all their diaper years in paper diapers, and even though I felt small bursts of guilt when I thought of our contribution to landfills, I didn’t consider cloth diapers an option. I mean, cloth is so yukky and hard to do, right?

Wrong. But it took two cloth diapering friends to debunk my myths.

Myth 1. Washing Cloth Diapers is a lot of work.

It’s work, but not a lot of work. Like 2-3 small loads a week, and I don’t even fold, I pile. It’s also a little work to keep up a stash of paper diapers, and this is eliminated.

Myth 2. Cloth Diapers are uncomfortable to the baby/ aren’t as healthy as paper.

Maybe vinyl pants are uncomfortable, but not the new laminated or fleece cloth covers (which there are dozens of choices on). Paper diapers do tend to wick away better, keeping baby dry, but then mommies tend to rely on that and not change the paper diapers as often as they should (this was me!) and that paper diaper can heat up. Some people think hot paper diapers are associated in male infertility when those baby boys grow up. Whether or not this is true, I’m just glad to avoid those clear bead things (chemical absorbants) which are use in the paper diapers and the bleach in the paper which is a known carcinogen.

Myth 3. Cloth Diapers are ugly.

Oh, they are so cute, with colors, patterns . . . whatever your flair. What’s ugly is a plastic bag of cartoon printed paper diapers, and later a pile of soiled paper diapers.

Myth 4. Cloth Diapers and hard to put on.

There are several methods of diapering (inserts, all in ones, prefold plus cover, etc.) but each is pretty easy to learn. With the new Snappi fasteners, it’s easy to secure the cloth diaper without pins, and most covers velcro on like a paper diaper.

Myth 5. It’s better to throw away the mess.

A (non-stinking) diaper pail which is dumped into the wash is so much nicer than a trash can of diapers stinking up the garage every week. And, ever thought of all the poop entombed in the landfill forever? That seems like a ecological nightmare.

Myth 6. Paper Diapers are a pretty cheap luxury.

Huggies from Costco was costing us about $40/mo. That’s times 30 months or so (if they potty train early). I think I can get more fun out of $1200 than buying diapers. 🙂

Myth 7. It’s All or Nothin’.

Even doing cloth diapers, I still use paper when we travel. And now on my 2 year old who is potty training (fingers crossed) and keeps the paper one dry a lot (Seventh Generation: no bleach in the paper diapers).

How To Start Cloth Diapers

There may be better ways to start cloth diapers, but I gave myself a challenge to spend about $80 and try it for 2 months. That way, if I hated it I could resell the diapers on diaperswappers.com and still be ahead money-wise.

I started reading some diaper websites, and was amazed at all the options (it can be overwhelming). What I finally settled on is the most simple, cost effective, and easiest method I know.

Cotton prefold from greenmountaindiapers.com because they are extra wide so they fit better. (Started with 12, at the end of my trial added another 12.)

Snappi from babyworks.com for fastening. (Started with 1, got another as a spare.)

Thirsties cover from babyworks.com to cover; reuse all day long unless a blowout. Fits well, few leaks, cute, good price. (Started with 3, but quickly had to buy 3 more so I could get through at least 2 days.)

Read about using Cloth Wipes here.

5 Gallon Bucket with lid which I had on hand; for throwing the soiled/wet diapers in (breastfed baby; but for baby eating food, the poop gets flushed down the toilet first). No solution in the bucket, I just dry bucket. When the bucket is full, I do laundry.

Laundering: dump bucket into washer, rinse bucket with 1 cup white vinegar which I then pour into wash. Rinse cycle on cold with vinegar. Wash cycle on hot with tiny bit of Bioclean soap and scoop Oxyclean. Second rinse in warm, no soap. Line dry the covers, send cloths through drier on hot (or line dry in summer).

That’s it.

It’s doable, cheap, and soft on my baby’s bum. What’s not to love?