Black Cherry Chutney

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I’m not sure if cherries are native to India, but I used some to make this chutney for our home school India fest. It was fantastic.

Black Cherry Chutney
Simmer in small saucepan until soft:
1.5 cups frozen organic black cherries (Costco)
1/2 cup pear butter
1/2 small onion, minced
1/4 cup water
1 tsp ginger powder
1 tsp cardamom powder
1/4 cup brown sugar or honey
1/8-1/4 tsp cayenne pepper (heat to taste)

When soft, mash cherries with a potato masher until blended in sauce. Add:
1/2 cup organic raisins
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar

Blend in until raisins have rehydrated. Pour into a jar a keep in the fridge. The natural pectins and chunks of fruit will give thick body without the addition of pectin or gelatin.

Enjoy as a condiment with curries.

Pectin vs. Gelatin for Making Jam

My Raspberry Freezer Jam

Christina of Ramey Ranch Review (check out her post on Making Mozarella) writes:

Pectin for Making Jam: I have heard pectin and gelatin content are about the same. While I’m not a vegetarian or anything, I do try to feed my family as wholesomely as possible. Animal waste products are not high on my healthful list! There are some alternative (vegetarian) jam pectins out there, but they are pricey. We live on a ranch and grow most of our own fruits and veggies. I preserve lots of food every year. I am looking for an economical alternative to pectin since I make 12 + batches of freezer jam per year. I would prefer to not cook and can the jam. I did find a product from Mary Jane’s Farm http://shop.maryjanesfarm.org/store/p/65-ChillOver-Powder.aspx. I heard a rumor you could use it for jam. I’m going to try to find out. If you find anything on this topic, please let me know.

Way to go, Christina, on growing the majority of your own fruits and veggies! That has got to be a huge amount of work in and of itself, not to mention the preserving. Your family is undoubtedly reaping the health rewards of your labors!

Pectin is a vegetarian product found in the cellular structure of fruits and veggies, and often sourced from citrus peels or apples. It can be pricey, particularly in small retail packages. In bulk from Azure Standard, a 1lb bag costs $42. 90; this makes about 320 cups of jam.

Gelatin, on the other hand, is an animal product, and most gelatin is made from pork carcasses. Chicken broth and beef broth (made from bones/carcasses) are marketable products, but pork broth doesn’t have much of a market, so this “waste” product is made profitable in the form of Jello, jams, and jellies.

Although this is a waste product of factory slaughterhouses (and that’s a disgusting thought with their sick animals and unsanitary practices!), gelatin in general is a very healthful and nourishing food; this is the main source of nourishment in bone broth (read Bone Broth: Body Builder) and gelatin can even be purchased in capsules as a nutritional supplement for joint problems.

So to find a clean source for gelatin . . . I thought briefly about whether you could make your own from bone broth; gelatin powder must be just dehydrated bone broth. However, I can’t imagine going to that amount of effort (and I didn’t find anything coming up when I googled making your own gelatin powder). I did find some other options, though: certified organic porcine (pork) gelatin, which is more expensive than the pectin above. The bulk size of 2lbs of powder should gel about 200 cups of liquid (perhaps it would be less in making jam?), with a current price of $53.10.

Some people prefer to avoid all pork products, organic or not, in which case beef gelatin is available, and quite a bit cheaper at $7.25 for 1lbs. This is from Azure Standard, a supplier of natural foods, so it is unclear to me if this is gelatin sourced from naturally raised beef or from conventional/factory farming, but a call to their customer service should clarify this. There is no information given on how much would be required to make jam, but I would think it would be 1:1 with the porcine gelatin. If this truly is naturally sourced gelatin, I think this would be an excellent, healthful addition to homemade jam, and an economical option too!

Chill Over Powder

I have no experience with this, although it sounds really interesting. I wonder what’s actually in it? I wouldn’t be surprised if Mary Jane is marketing her own brand of fruit pectin, similar to the one above, in which case you just need to compare the yield/price against the price at Azure or another bulk supplier of natural products.

[Christina writes back: I found out what Chill Over Powder is made from. Ingredients: Agar-agar kanten, an odorless powdered sea vegetable with superior gelling qualities—a MaryJanesFarm exclusive.]

Read Raspberry Jam for my recent experience on using both pectin and gelatin. Good luck in all your summer preserving!

Raspberry Jam

My Raspberry Freezer Jam

Today I made raspberry freezer jam with some local fresh picked raspberries. My first batch was the “yummy” batch because my husband asked me to make sure that it turned out really good. 🙂 My second batch is made with honey rather than sugar, gelatin rather than pectin (because I ran out of pectin, and I wanted to experiment with gelatin), and without lemon juice because my daughter is allergic to citrus. Here are my recipes:

Raspberry Jam
4 pts. fresh raspberries, rinsed and mashed with potato masher (yield 3.25 cups)
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice, stirred into raspberries
1 package pectin, slowly added and thoroughly stirred into raspberry mixture
4.25 cups organic sugar, added slowly to raspberry mixture, then stirred until completely dissolved (it takes awhile)

Pour into freshly washed glass pint jars, leaving 1 inch at top for expansion. Leave on counter for 1 day to set, then freeze. Thaw in refrigerator and use within a few weeks. Yielded 5 jars, and tastes delicious (of course, with all that sugar!).

Raspberry Jam with Honey
4 pts. fresh raspberries, rinsed and mashed with potato masher (yield 3.25 cups)
1.25 cups honey
4 envelopes gelatin, stirred into 1/2 cup water in saucepan (my jam turned out a little too firm, so I’ll try 3 envelopes next time)

Add about 1/3 of the mashed raspberries and all of the honey to saucepan, and stir over medium heat until it begins to simmer. Add back to the rest of raspberries. Pour into freshly washed glass pint jars, lid, and place directly in freezer (one recipe I was adapting stated that if left covered at room temperature the gelatin would liquefy). It did set up, even more firmly than the pectin jam. Yielded 3.5 jars jam, and tastes nice, although not as bright of a flavor as if I had added lemon juice.

Read Pectin Vs. Gelatin for Making Jam a review on the health and price comparisons of these two products.

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