Choosing Olive Oil

Q: In addition to using the test for fake olive oil, what comments do you have for all of
us on buying cold pressed olive oil?

~Heather

A: Oils and fats (butter, olive oil, coconut oil, etc.) is the category of foods which I prioritize as #1 for switching to organic. (See the Organic Food tab for my list.) So I’m always looking for that Organic seal when buying olive oil. However, if you can’t find an organic olive oil which hardens in the fridge, then the certification has been falsified (every system has cheaters I guess), so I would then look for an oil from a small family farm in the US. My reasoning is that family farms tend to make more conscientious choices, and sometimes have organic practices but can’t afford the certifications.

Also, you already mentioned “cold pressed olive oil” which is a great thing to point out: the processing of the oil does have an effect on the final product. Cold pressing avoids damaging the unsaturated parts of the oil, which would set it up for rancidity before it makes it to your kitchen. “Extra Virgin Olive Oil” is the first press of the olives; the subsequent presses produce a lower grade of olive oil, with fewer of it’s healthy properties…sometimes called “light olive oil” because it has less of the distinctive olive flavor. There is no difference in caloric value. I only buy cold pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

Another thought is that glass is an inert material for the oil bottle…a large jug of oil in plastic isn’t a great idea, even if it’s one of the lesser toxic plastics. Most high quality EVOO that I see today is sold in dark green glass bottles, which can make it difficult to see the color/flavor profile, but which protects it from degradation/rancidity caused by light. Light and heat are what you should strive to protect your oil from as it’s stored.

Speaking of flavor profile…this seems to be it’s own art, like wine tasting. My (very!) simplified understanding is that greener means a sharper flavor and golden means a more mellow flavor. What you choose is up to your own palate!

The best way to enjoy olive oil is cold, as in salad dressing. I also like to pour it over steamed vegetables like broccoli, and top with Pecorino (a sheep cheese similar to Parmesan). Enjoy!

How to Test Your Olive Oil

So the word on the street is that our olive oil may be fake, or rather cut with cheaper (and unhealthy) oils like canola, corn, or worse.

How to know if yours is?

Put it in the refrigerator.

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If it turns solid at this lower temperature, that means it is indeed an oil with saturated and unsaturated fats; the signature of olive oil.

You can see my olive oil above; after two days of refrigeration, it was pretty solid. Of course, it’s impossible to pour in this state, so don’t *keep* it in the fridge. 🙂

What brand did I buy? Trader Joes Organic Spanish EVOO, a great deal at $6.99 for 17oz.

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(I know…this sounds like an add straight from the TJ’s Frequent Flyer. Fortunately for you, these are my honest opinions. Unfortunately for me, I’m not getting paid to rave about their products.)

Surviving Influenza A in Pregnancy

I’ve contracted Influenza only a few times in my life. It’s never fun. But the sickest I’ve ever been (I think?) was last month; fighting Influenza A while 27 weeks pregnant.

My husband and children were the first ones to show symptoms, with fever, headache, and extreme fatigue. After the first day, a cough and snotty nose were the residual symptoms, but fever was gone in 12-24 hours. As soon as the first child was sick, I rubbed everyone’s feet with essential oils, put some on their chests and backs as well, fed everyone vitamin C and a high loading dose of D and A drops.

And then the next day, I became sick. Fever of 102 (which is pretty high for me). Tachycardia (racing heart; mine was 108-125 bpm), which is not uncommon with fever. Fatigue which kept me in bed from the time I woke up. Beginnings of a cough, and congested sinuses. As the cough progressed, the muscles around my ribs suffered severe soreness. I just hurt everywhere.

Midwife Care/Naturopathic Care

One of the great things about having a midwife is that my calls are returned 24/7 by the caregiver. My midwife, Catherine Schaefer, is a Naturopathic Doctor, in addition to being a Certified Nurse Midwife, so I felt very confident in her ability to advise me in the best treatments during my illness.

In addition to speaking with my midwife twice, I had previously scheduled appointments at my MD/ND’s clinic for iron IVs to treat anemia; these were on days 3 and 9. The nurse checked my vitals on day 3 and the Dr. did an exam on day 9 (see below). If you are ill in pregnancy, it is important for your and your baby’s health to contact your health care provider(s).

I normally allow fevers to take their course, as they serve the purpose of killing the pathogens causing the illness. But when I spoke to my midwife, Catherine, she advised that I really should not allow my fever to exceed 102 for the sake of the baby, and that it would still be effective against the virus below 102. She also advised that I should stay in bed because she was seeing pneumonia develop even after a week of illness if the patient did not reserve all their energy for healing. Since I’ve had pneumonia twice I’m already at higher risk for developing it, so I was motivated to take all measures I could to avoid it. We also discussed several natural medicinal therapies. In addition to several of the therapies which I did follow, she offered homeopathic therapy for Influenza, but homeopathics and essential oils cancel each other, so I felt like it was best to stick with what I had already begun.

Pregnancy Complication

OK, so if I gave this to you in a blow by blow, it would be a long story of misery, so I’ll summarize. I was sicker for longer, much longer, than anyone else in my family. I assume this is because I am pregnant. My fever and tachycardia lasted for 5 days/nights without breaking, then returned for a few hours on days 6 and 7. I am new to Essential Oils, but I was very impressed with the use of Peppermint for fever (see below).

The exhaustion was so profound, I stayed in bed from days 1-9, except to go to the bathroom. Days 10-12 I spent mostly in bed, with a few trips to other parts of the house for food and other needs. Days 13- 18 I had to take a long nap or two. During my days in bed, my husband and children rose to the occasion and cared for me, prayed for me, brought me water, food, and whatever else I needed (mostly I slept). Several dear friends brought chicken soup and juice-jello for me and other meals for my family, prayed for me, and watched my children during several days when my husband needed to work. Thank you dear friends! What would we do without community? I’m so grateful.

My cough developed quickly during the fever so that on the third night, although the mucous in my lungs was loose enough, there was so much of it I felt that I couldn’t get oxygen from my breaths. This was a scary thing to realize at midnight. Again, Peppermint saved the day…I began to apply it each hour (when I woke gasping for air) and it allowed me to breathe. I am certain it kept me out of the ER that night.

My Pregnancy Influenza Protocol

[I am not a health care professional nor licensed to diagnose, treat, or cure any disease. Please consult with your healthcare provided before beginning any health protocol, especially during pregnancy.]

Essential Oils
As I said, I’m new to essential oils, having only begun using them therapeutically (vs. as aromatics or in cleaners) in October. I am currently using Young Living oils since they are the only company which seemed to have a completely safe track record and the most data on use in pregnancy.

  • “Thieves” oil blend (immune system/antibacterial/antiviral). I used this liberally on my children, and by the time I was ill, realized I was running out. I was able to use it at least once on my feet (2-3 drops) and twice or so as a drop in my cheek. I felt it truly did boost my immune response, and wished I wasn’t running out! I made an oils order, but with the weekend and 3 days of shipping, it didn’t arrive until after my fever/the worst was passed. I did begin taking it a couple times in my cheek each day after receiving my new bottle, through the remainder of my convalescence.
  • “Oregano” oil (antibacterial/antiviral). I used this liberally (3-4 drops) on my feet, perhaps 4x day, against the virus and to ward off bacterial pneumonia.
  • “Peppermint” oil (fevers/airways/sinus). I used this liberally on my feet, over Oregano, to reduce fever and clear my airways. It consistently reduced my fever by 2 degrees; 102 to 100, or 101 to 99. For this use, I applied it about every 3 hours. My mother (sick with Influenza a few weeks before) reported that Tylanol (Acetaminophen) did not reduce her fever (103 and higher) at all, but that Peppermint oil on her feet reduced it by 2 degrees, as it did for me. Additionally, I used peppermint liberally on my feet about every 1-2 hours on the night when I had difficulty in breathing/lungs. I took it as a drop in the mouth to help ease/drain my congested sinuses.
  • “Lemon” oil (loosens and thins mucous). To avoid pneumonia, it was important for my cough to be as effective as possible. At one point I felt that the phlegm was too thick to cough out of my lungs, so I began to put a drop or two of lemon oil in my water. It was very helpful in thinning the mucous. I began to run low on the lemon, so alternated between the oil and drinking the juice of a whole lemon or lime plus a TB or so of maple syrup in a 12oz glass of water. At this point, it was difficult for me to eat much of any food, and this drink is a good nourishing drink.
  • “PanAway” oil blend. I used this liberally on my rib area to relieve the muscle pain associated with coughing and with strain from laying on my sides for so long (pregnant belly pull!).
  • “Frankincense” oil (antibacterial) and “Purification” oil blend (antibacterial). When most congested in my lungs, I used 3-4 drops of Frankincense over my lung area, then covered with Purification. And I made myself cough whenever the urge arose, regardless of the pain to my ribs and head which was suffering a splitting headache. Like a fever, a good cough is your friend during illness.
  • “Joy” oil blend (cardiac/calming). I used this (2 drops) with Frankincense over my heart to help end the tachycardia (see below).
  • “Eucalyptus” oil (sinus). This oil was one I had on hand from years ago when I had a sinus infection. It was not from Young Living so I did not want to take in internally/topically, and after several years it has likely lost it’s potency, but I diffused it in my room for whatever benefit it may have given my congested sinuses.

Breaking the Fever

After 5 days/nights of fever and tachycardia I was exhausted. I just felt like I needed to break the fever and let my heart calm down. Those that are not pregnant can do the “cold sock therapy” or the “wet sheet therapy” but I did not feel that these kinds of shock would be good for me/baby. After consulting with my midwife who advised that Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is safer for the fetus than Ibuprofen (Advil), I took a single 500mg Acetaminophen and took a warm Epsom Salt bath with clove oil (again, my clove is several years old and not therapeutic grade, but I used it for whatever residual help it may have given). Epsom salt baths are helpful in drawing toxins out of the body, relaxing the muscles, and providing the body with some magnesium which is an immune stimulant and helps clear lungs, among other things.

After the bath, and an hour after taking the Acetaminophen, the fever had only lowered a slight amount, and the tachycardia was still present. I reapplied the peppermint oil on my feet, and used a few drops of Joy and Frankincense on my heart. Finally, the fever broke and my heart rate slowed to about 70bpm. I woke in the middle of the night and felt that my heart rate was beginning to speed up…this is odd, but by just reaching out and touching my sleeping husband with my hand, it calmed down again.

The following two afternoons I again had a fever, this time low grade (99). I used the peppermint again, and it did not seem to reduce it immediately, but the fever only lasted about 2 hours.

Lifestyle

  • I stayed in bed to use all energy for fighting the virus and symptoms. I feel this was vital.
  • I drank water or herbal tea. My goal was the same 75oz I had been drinking, but it became really hard for me to drink more than 6oz at a time, and I know I probably didn’t drink my goal on any given day. A few times I took a TB of liquid chlorophyll in my water.
  • As I stated, several dear friends brought homemade chicken soup (the kind made with the whole carcass so it is very nourishing) to our home, and one made juice-jello. For the first 5 days or so my husband brought the soup to me pureed in a mug so I could drink it, which takes less effort than spooning; after that time he brought it in a bowl. The juice-jello is made by adding pure gelatin to juice, honey, and in this case pureed strawberries. It makes for a protein rich snack which goes down easily. There were several times during my fever where I felt like my body/baby were truly hungry, although I couldn’t imagine eating anything more than broth and jello. It was really important for me to continue to supply protein and calories to my growing baby. My breakfast meals were either the jello or kefir/flax oil/banana/strawberry smoothies. Still, I lost 7lbs the first week.
  • I coughed, as often and as effectively as I could.
  • I took a total of 3 Epsom Salt baths, starting on the day after I began waking at night drenched in sweat, which is a sign the body is trying to clear all the toxins created by the virus dying off. Upon waking in sweat, I stripped off the wet clothes, scrubbed my skin vigorously with a dry terrycloth towel (which helps to remove toxins), dressed, and went back to sleep.
  • I blew my nose gently and snorted and spit often into tissue while in bed. And I used a Netti Pot with sea salt flush to clear my nose once during a shower. I also used a whole dropper full of my eucalyptus oil in the shower (floor) as a steam inhalation (only had strength for 1 shower during those two weeks). I used the Xlear nasal spray often to loosen nasal mucous and moisten the irritated/dry sensation in my sinuses.

Nutriceuticals

Vitamin A (Palmitate)

Vitamin A is contraindicated in pregnancy. The original study upon which this recommendation was based was quite flawed, asking women to remember after pregnancy what their supplemental and dietary intake had been. Since that time, some studies have established birth defects associated with excess intake during the first trimester.

However, vitamin A seems to be the most effective agent for avoiding the cytokine storm reaction in certain Influenzas; it has immune modulating properties, and is quite specific to mucous membranes (lung tissue cells).

[Beta Carotene is often confused with vitamin A; most people convert beta carotene into vitamin A, but some do so poorly, in which case eating animal foods where it has already been converted, like eggs, butter, and liver, is a good idea nutritionally. I know I’m one of those people who poorly convert (one symptom of poor conversion is keratosis pilaris; bumps on the back of the arms). Beta Carotene is considered safe in pregnancy at moderate levels in prenatals, and of course can be obtained through eating yellow, orange, and green fruits and vegetables. But for use during illness, you need a higher dosage than is available in food. ]

I weighed these risks and benefits with my midwife, and chose to take a high dosage of vitamin A for 3 days, then discontinue. I took 50,000IU drops (Biotics Research) in one dose during each of those 3 days. I was 27 weeks pregnant, well beyond the first trimester/fragile genetic reproduction time.

Vitamin D3

Vitamin D is recommended in pregnancy, and I had been taking 10,000IU in drops (Biotics Research) daily. When ill, I increase the dosage to 25,000 IU of vitamin D3 for 3 days, then dropped back to 10,000 IU daily.

NAC

In my first phone conversation to my midwife, she recommended I take NAC, which she said has some evidence of protective effect for a fetus during maternal virus/fever. I took 500mg NAC immediately following the phone call. I forgot to take this after the initial dosage, but probably should have taken it each day I had fever.

Prenatal/Cal/Mag/Zinc/B12/Folic Acid/Vitamin C

I was pretty out of it, so although I planned to continue to take my prenatal and other daily supplements while sick, I’m not sure I got them in each day. It was also an issue of remembering to ask someone to bring them upstairs to me . . . I know I did take my prescription thyroid and adrenal insufficiency medications . . . any other supplements were just for good measure. I know I drank several glasses of water with Vit. C/Magnesium powder. It was pretty random.

Modified Myer’s Cocktail

On day 9 I kept a previously scheduled appointment for an iron IV at the office of my MD/ND, Daniel Newman. I was fortunate that I was there during his lunch break and he was able to listen to my lungs. He noted I had not developed pneumonia, but because of my wheezing and continued weakness, he recommended I take a high potency vitamin/mineral IV immediately following the iron infusion, which I did. I don’t know exactly what he prescribed for it, but it did include magnesium, vit. C, and B12.

Elderberry/Royal Jelly Syrup

When I became ill, my mother quickly ordered a fantastic Elderberry Syrup to be shipped to me. It came around the same time as the Essential Oils which I had run out ; after the fever and the worst was passed. Nonetheless, I began to take 2tsp. 2 or 3 times per day, and felt that it helped me to recover. It’s delicious, so you won’t have trouble if you need to give it to a child!

And I lived.

What To Feed The Baby

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Question, via email:

I’m the one with Lucky baby that had such a hard time with formula [after a forced wean from breastmilk]. So he’s eating pretty much everything under the sun, except I don’t do any dairy. I tried some goats milk on him and he didn’t really seem to like it so just havent again. I’m confused on how to eat myself let alone make sure I’m giving him what his body needs at 13 months. Some sites say low protein high healthy fats, some say paleo for babies is best, etc. So I really like how healthy you and your family are, love following your blog and wondering if you could tell my what type of foods you fed your babies? I don’t know if they should be having coconut pancakes, rice flour, barely those type of grains. It seems like since I don’t know I feed him a lot of fruit and veggies.

My Answer: (I am not a licensed health care professional, and this is not health advice. Just my opinion.)

Hi friend! It can be confusing with so many opinions out there on diet and nutrition. I think coconut pancakes and fruits and veggies sound great, although you want to make sure he gets enough of the animal proteins/fats too since they are super-foods! He may disdain goats milk, but if you offered him raw cheese he may just love it!

There’s a lot to say on this subject; here are some principles I’ve used as guides for feeding my babies 10 months and up.

What’s good for you, is good for baby.

If you are pursuing a whole food, nutrient dense diet, then the foods which you haul in from the farmer, cook up in your crockpot, ferment on your counters, or bake in your oven are going to be excellent, nutrient dense choices for your child.

I don’t subscribe to the idea that baby food is something to be bought in small containers, have no resemblance to adult food, and be fed to a child at a different time of day than adults eat (although of course this happens occasionally). Someday (soon!) this tiny person will sit at the table with us and eat what we are eating, so why not get them used to the routine and the food while they are still in their high chair? Plus, the idea of cooking two different menus makes me want to cry.

Breastmilk is Best, as long as you can

I like to wait as long as possible before introducing food at all, and even water unless the weather turns hot. My babies have waited for their first bite of any food until between 8 and 10 months. I look for their cues on hunger/lip smacking/saliva. My last baby, a girl, was quite interested at 8 months, but my largest boy was barely interested at 10 months. Their hunger for food usually arrives about the time their first teeth do. There is some thought that waiting until this time to give foods can reduce allergic responses to food.

The first foods I give my babies are: egg yolk from a soft boiled/over easy egg, butter, liver pate (it’s cooked), cod liver oil, banana, avocado, as these are all soft and nutrient dense. After a few weeks of these foods, they are usually ready to try more flavors, so I begin to offer what we are eating.

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Egg yolk!

Waiting for molars. . . think soft foods

Dinner is our main meal, and there is nearly always something that baby can eat, and often she can eat all of it. I invested in a small baby food grinder years ago, the hand crank kind (portable!), which can be used to blend up soft foods like spaghetti with meat marinara, roasted chicken and broccoli, anything made in a crockpot, the chunky parts of soup (add back to broth), beans, rice, and most cooked veggies. It only takes a minute, and the child gets to experience those flavors which he has been smelling while dinner was cooking. He’s eating what mom and dad eat. He’s eating it fresh, and not frozen or canned. He’s eating food that tastes good, and if he rejects it on first or fifth try, you can be pretty confident that at some point he will love it like you do.

Some foods are hard for a baby to eat: salad, anything really chewy or crunchy. However, these foods are innately difficult to digest as well, so your diet should be filled with lots of other foods he is able to eat. That said, I will sometimes give baby a teeny tiny piece of lettuce with a homemade dressing on it. . . or the cranberry in the salad. . . or a feta crumble. I stick it right in their mouth and wait for the face. These are strong flavors, and I want the baby to experience them, along with some psychological coaching: “yum, yum, yum!” They are shocked, they spit, we all laugh.

If we are eating steak, I try to cook it medium rare, and then shave off very small pieces (no need for chewing) and feed them to baby. Yes, steak! My babies have loved this. I have also heard that indigenous mothers chew food for their babies, which begins to break down the foods with mom’s saliva enzymes, before transferring it to baby’s mouth.

We love taco salad; baby can eat the ground beef, beans, avocado, sour cream (if no reaction), tomatoes (if no reaction), cilantro, and lime.

Soups are messy, but we eat a lot of them in the winter, and if they have a bone broth base it’s awesome nutrition. We have a plastic pocket type bib which really helps contain the mess when spoon feeding baby, or the IKEA toddler smock which is full coverage for when baby feeds herself.

Good Fats = Good Brain

Brains, especially growing brains, need fat. Healthy, saturated fats. Besides water, that is what the brain is mostly comprised of, so it only makes sense that babies need a healthy dose of saturated fats daily for the significant growth of their gray matter.

Butter (grassfed/naturally yellow is best), avocado, egg yolk (soft boiled or over easy), coconut oil, nut butters, animal fats found with the meat, liver (organic animals) olive oil (cold pressed and uncooked), and heavy cream with or without the milk (raw from grassfed cows is best) are all great ways to feed baby’s developing brain, and keep baby satisfied for longer between meals (or at night!). Some of these are a meal or snack by themselves: egg yolk, liver, nut butter, avocado, ground meat. Others can be toppings for other foods: butter, coconut oil, olive oil.

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Butter!

Balancing Food Groups

We all need protein, and carbohydrates, and fats. Babies are no exception. I try to give my baby foods from each food group during a day, with a special emphasis on protein/fat at each meal. I personally feel better when I limit my sugars/starches, so my children’s diet roughly mimics my own, but they do eat more grains and fruits than I do.

In the US, toddler fare is universally offered as grain and sweets based. Look at any kids menu and you will see breads, pastas, crackers, fruit cups, sweetened dairy products, and downright candy as the leading act. Most foods marketed to/for kids fall into this category as well. Rather than rant about the lack of protein and fat, and the sugars that push kids toward addiction, set them up for diabetes or worse (OK, I just ranted), I’ll just advise: do not copy this diet in your home.

Do you feel better, have more energy and fewer ailments, sleep and perform exercise better, and feel more satisfied on mostly protein, mostly carbs, or somewhere in between? If you have never given this any thought, The Metabolic Typing Diet may help you (gives self-test checklists) to determine this for yourself. And have your spouse take the test too, as your child will likely pattern after one or both of you. Adoptive parents will have to watch carefully for mood/behavior in their baby following different meal ratios.

Depending on your metabolic type, you may feel better on more carbohydrates than I do in your diet, and your child is likely to do well with this diet as well. In this case, your healthy diet would contain more whole grain breads and porridge (soaked grains are best), starchy veggies like potato, yam, and corn, and fruits than mine does. But you should still be fighting the “goldfish at every snack” mentality for your child, since these are just not whole foods.

Regardless of how much of each food your baby eats, it is difficult to get a child to eat much of anything if they start off a meal with fruits, since those sugars are absorbed into their bloodstream quickly and their hunger signal turns off. It usually works better for me to serve “courses” starting with the protein/fat portion of the meal, and finishing with a few fruit pieces.

Allergies and Introductions: Every One is Unique

My husband and I have few allergies, but the few things which I am sensitive to (chicken eggs, cow dairy as a toddler) I have been wary of introducing too early to my children. I am also gluten intolerant, and after two of my children have tested positive as well, we have assumed it is hereditary and have put all our children on a gluten free diet.

Since every one is unique, watch for reactions when introducing the “common allergens” and acidic foods like tomato and some fruits. I’ve found that a baby may need to avoid a food, but a few months later they will be able to eat it without reaction. The most common reactions are loose stools and rashes at mouth or bottom. Vomiting, constipation, eczema, or histamine responses (swollen eyes, sneezing, difficulty breathing) are more severe reactions to a food, in which case it may be much longer before a child can handle that food again, if ever. You should contact your child’s doctor with a severe reaction, as follow-up testing may be advised.

One largely overlooked component to allergies is imbalance of intestinal flora. Babies usually have flora similar to mom’s, since they acquired their first dose from her in the birth canal and received daily probiotics in her milk. If you question your own gut health, or you/baby have a history of yeast or antibiotics, your baby may need some supplemental probiotics. I have used the Klaire Labs brand of Infant Formula probiotics. Homemade sauerkraut juice or yogurt are other ways to support baby’s intestinal flora.

Quality is Key

Eating an organic diet is expensive . . . but so is illness. Avoiding unnecessary chemicals on our foods is always a good idea, but even more crucial for the developing bodies of our children. Choose organic and grassfed whenever you find it and can budget it. Here is my prioritized list of foods to source organically, starting with oils and fats, and all animal products. Fruits and veggies are further down the list; you can download a free guide to the “Dirty Dozen” and “Clean Fifteen” on Enviromental Working Group’s site, or download a free app to your smart phone which will allow you to look up produce item by item while at the market.

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Roasted Veggies!

Meal Ideas: These are all foods my babies and toddlers actually eat.

Breakfast

  • Scrambled eggs with butter (can season with homemade sauerkraut juice), blueberries (this is a meal they can feed themselves)
  • Unsweetened goat yogurt (or drizzled with honey after 12 months), or kefir smoothie, whole grain bread with almond butter
  • Soaked oatmeal/honey/butter/raisins with finely sliced natural breakfast sausage on the side
  • Sweet Oven Souffle, cut into squares, grapefruit wedges
  • Protein waffles, butter (syrup is just too messy for babies!)

Lunch

  • Veggie soup made with bone broth, avocado and/or Creme Fraiche (whipping cream cultured with yogurt starter for 24 hours) on top, can add sauerkraut juice after it has cooled a little in the bowl (home fermented or Bubbies brand are alive with probiotics)
  • Grassfed hot dog link, finely sliced, small pear pieces, cooked carrot medalions (another self-feed meal)
  • Hummus with olive oil, dabs of liver pate or avocado, applesauce or pumpkin souflee
  • Canned tuna/salmon/chicken with homemade mayo and raisins, thawed or cooked peas on the side
  • Dinner leftovers

Add a large salad to any of the above, and you’ve answered what to feed yourself for lunch as well.

Snack

  • Slices of raw cheese and a few raisins or apple slices (portable)
  • Goat yogurt with honey drizzle
  • Glass of raw milk (goat best for many babies) and a homemade muffin with butter (whole grain or almond/coconut flour, can have carrots, zucchini, or fruit in it) (also somewhat portable)
  • Banana and almond butter (peanut butter if no reaction)

Dinner

  • What you are eating!

Misto Olive Oil Sprayer

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Looking for a way to replace the easy “Pam spray” in your baking? This Misto bottle can be filled with your Hugh quality olive oil, then pumps up for 15 seconds of aerosol type spraying. Perfect for greasing pans for baking, or as an easy way to distribute oil on veggies for grilling.

Pam is made with toxic refined oils…and then new olive oil versions still have emulsifiers and propellant chemicals added. This is a way for you to avoid all that, and it’s much more sustainable than a can that goes in the landfill.

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Costco is selling two packs of these handy things for about $16. One for yourself, and one to give as a Christmas gift!

Baby Snacks

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With my first baby, I gave Cheerios to develop the “pincer” coordination. Nine years later, with my fifth baby, it’s organic raisins.

She began eating solids last month at eight months of age. Bone broth/veggie soup, egg yolk, avocado, and banana were the first foods…but she has liked everything I give her from our plates. She’s now getting about half her calories from breastmilk and the other half from food, I’m guessing. Happy and healthy!

Not All Honey Is Created Equal

Opening our 4 gallon bucket of raw, local apple blossom honey is an event each September. We all stand around the bucket, waiting for the first whiffs of flowery sweetness. It’s creamy. I spoon it into jars to avoid using a pickaxe later after it hardens.

This year we bought 2 four gallon buckets, and we are nearing the end.

I had read about honey being diluted with corn syrup, so I did a little searching. Looks like that’s not the worst of it; much commercial, highly filtered honey may be imported illegally to the US from China or India and carry chemicals and heavy metals.

Read this link to see the importance of leaving the pollen in the honey; it can be tracked as true honey.

http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2011/11/tests-show-most-store-honey-isnt-honey/

I will continue to purchase local raw honey in 4 gallon buckets, and supplement with Mesquite honey from Trader Joes. And no more using honey packets at restaurants.

Last Week’s Meal Plan

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Mock Parmesan Chicken and Greek Salad

I made a meal plan last week, and actually stuck to it. Seems like I usually end up switching my days up, or failing to plan part of the week and ending up in a scramble, or stretching the leftovers in odd ways. Not this week!

This was my plan; just dinners, as breakfast is smoothies, eggs, yogurt, or muffins and lunch is leftovers, veggie chicken bone soup, or Applegate Farms excellent organic grassfed sugar free uncured hot dogs.

M: herb roasted pastured chicken, celery sticks and herb yogurt dip, cantaloupe
T: spinach bacon mushroom quiche and kale salad
W: chicken divan
(meat from Monday’s bird, a bag of frozen organic broccoli, mock hollandaise sauce with some added nutmeg and curry powder, topped with quatro formaggio cheese and baked at 350)
T: greek salad alongside mock chicken parmesan (4 jumbo chicken breasts in the crockpot layered with a jar of marinara, a package of sliced havarti or provolone, 1/2 cup almond flour, and 1 cup of Parmesan, cooked on high for 6 hours; cut up chicken and leave lid off for last two hours)
F: hamburgers in SCD buns with bacon and all the fixings, spiced pear tart for birthday dessert
S: grilled sirloin steak, grilled summer veggies, cantaloupe: gorgeous weather and we ate out on the patio
S: Leftovers, mainly lunch soup and chicken marinara

I planned an oven dinner for Wednesday so the oven would be warm when I began the yogurt that night, and a crockpot meal for Thursday so I wouldn’t need to use the oven while the yogurt was still in there. I soaked walnuts and almonds on Tuesday to have them ready to dry in the warming drawer while the yogurt was going in the oven. This worked so well, I’m going to do it weekly.

Also, instead of drying all the almonds, I reserved 1.5 cups of soaked almonds to make almond milk, and used the leftover meal from making the milk to make pancakes on Friday morning.

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The kids were delighted to have pancakes (with blackberry syrup) and “peach tea lattes” made with almond milk and honey on Hudson’s birthday this week. 🙂

Better Butter (Cheaper)

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Switching to organic butter is such an important step in reducing our toxic exposure. But the price difference can seem daunting when you are feeding a large family. Here are some ways I’ve found to buy it for less.

Baseline price: Costco is about $3.95 a pound, Trader Joes $4.79 a pound. These are actually both great prices; at specialty stores it can be up to $9 a pound (more in Hawaii says my tropical sister). Note that I find the TJs butter to be higher quality than the Costco at certain times of the year (sweeter, more yellow).

Direct from the farm: I prefer to buy 12 pound blocks of butter directly from an organic dairy, and cut and wrap it myself. This is the BEST golden butter from grass fed cows, and is the cheapest at $3.25 a pound. But it takes some planning and coordination.

On clearance: yes, although organic butter rarely goes on sale, it does go on clearance at our local Safeway (see photo above). I’m so glad this major supermarket has made a decision to stock organic products, however their customer base continues to buy mostly conventional, so often their organic dairy products reach their expiration date before they are purchased. I will occasionally drop in to see what has been reduced to 50% off, and if it’s freezable I’ll stock up. For the butter above I paid $2.50 a pound! You could even check the expiration date on the fresher packages, and mark on your calendar for three days prior to the sell by date. Then drop in on that day; you’ll get it for less than conventional butter, help the store to cut its losses, and save butter from the fate of the dumpster.

And He Eats His Dinner

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He stabs. He examines. He eats his vegetables. Two servings of them, and all his salmon!

Veggie Roast
Chunky chopped: onion, zucchini, bell peppers, crimini mushrooms with whole cherry tomatoes, drizzled with olive oil and Celtic sea salt and garlic granules. Place in cast iron skillet and roast over hot grill for 20 minutes. Stir occasionally. Serve with joy.

Roasted Salmon
Place rinsed fillet of Alaskan Salmon skin side down in tin foil “boat” and brush with marinade: 1/8 cup Tamari sauce, 1 Tb honey, juice of large lemon, 2Tb olive oil, 1/4 tsp. each dill weed and garlic powder. Roast for about 15 minutes over hot grill, until it flakes. Scoop fish off of its skin when serving.