Choosing Olive Oil

Q: In addition to using the test for fake olive oil, what comments do you have for all of
us on buying cold pressed olive oil?

~Heather

A: Oils and fats (butter, olive oil, coconut oil, etc.) is the category of foods which I prioritize as #1 for switching to organic. (See the Organic Food tab for my list.) So I’m always looking for that Organic seal when buying olive oil. However, if you can’t find an organic olive oil which hardens in the fridge, then the certification has been falsified (every system has cheaters I guess), so I would then look for an oil from a small family farm in the US. My reasoning is that family farms tend to make more conscientious choices, and sometimes have organic practices but can’t afford the certifications.

Also, you already mentioned “cold pressed olive oil” which is a great thing to point out: the processing of the oil does have an effect on the final product. Cold pressing avoids damaging the unsaturated parts of the oil, which would set it up for rancidity before it makes it to your kitchen. “Extra Virgin Olive Oil” is the first press of the olives; the subsequent presses produce a lower grade of olive oil, with fewer of it’s healthy properties…sometimes called “light olive oil” because it has less of the distinctive olive flavor. There is no difference in caloric value. I only buy cold pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

Another thought is that glass is an inert material for the oil bottle…a large jug of oil in plastic isn’t a great idea, even if it’s one of the lesser toxic plastics. Most high quality EVOO that I see today is sold in dark green glass bottles, which can make it difficult to see the color/flavor profile, but which protects it from degradation/rancidity caused by light. Light and heat are what you should strive to protect your oil from as it’s stored.

Speaking of flavor profile…this seems to be it’s own art, like wine tasting. My (very!) simplified understanding is that greener means a sharper flavor and golden means a more mellow flavor. What you choose is up to your own palate!

The best way to enjoy olive oil is cold, as in salad dressing. I also like to pour it over steamed vegetables like broccoli, and top with Pecorino (a sheep cheese similar to Parmesan). Enjoy!

How to Test Your Olive Oil

So the word on the street is that our olive oil may be fake, or rather cut with cheaper (and unhealthy) oils like canola, corn, or worse.

How to know if yours is?

Put it in the refrigerator.

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If it turns solid at this lower temperature, that means it is indeed an oil with saturated and unsaturated fats; the signature of olive oil.

You can see my olive oil above; after two days of refrigeration, it was pretty solid. Of course, it’s impossible to pour in this state, so don’t *keep* it in the fridge. 🙂

What brand did I buy? Trader Joes Organic Spanish EVOO, a great deal at $6.99 for 17oz.

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(I know…this sounds like an add straight from the TJ’s Frequent Flyer. Fortunately for you, these are my honest opinions. Unfortunately for me, I’m not getting paid to rave about their products.)