Pantry 2 [Diet Makeover pt. 8]

Ok, here’s a more thorough pantry review. We sorted all the SCD legal foods onto one shelf, and left the illegals on the other shelves.

I’ll show you the illegal first. Pantry door:

20120314-200119.jpg

And two high shelves:

20120314-200310.jpg

And the same two shelves, this time panning further into the pantry:

20120314-200433.jpg

And then a lower (kid eye height) with the legal foods (lowest shelf illegal again):

20120314-200631.jpg

We see canned tomatoes, tuna, chicken, and fruit with no sugar.

And panning to the left on this “legal” shelf:

20120314-200836.jpg

We see canned pumpkin, capers, pure juices, marinara (this one the fat-free version of Wholefoods brand has no sugar or soy/canola oil). In the picture you can see unsweetened chocolate which is not allowed on most SCD lists, but it may be used in moderation later on.

It’s a little discouraging to look at all the “can’t eats” but we’re not throwing them out at this point. If American Family has gluten testing which comes back positive, the gluten products will have to go, but they may want to use some of the sugary things for holiday baking. Those decisions are bridges to cross in the future.

12 Easy [Painful and Expensive] Steps to an Organic Diet!

OK, so the title of this post is a joke. Of course going completely organic (from a conventional diet) isn’t going to be easy. Yeah, painful and expensive might be more like it.

And overwhelming. I remembered wondering Where do I start? So to make it easi-er for you, I have put together a list of what to change first in your pantry and diet, as well as some tips on what to look for when you shop and where to get good prices.

What to Change First In Your Pantry

  1. Oils and Fats
  2. Dairy
  3. Eggs
  4. Meats and Fish
  5. Water and Beverages
  6. Flours and Grains
  7. Fruit
  8. Vegetables
  9. Sweeteners
  10. Nuts and Legumes
  11. Salt and Spices
  12. Vinegars and Condiments

I realize that some people may reorder these priorities, particularly the first 4, as they are all so important. But I’m fairly comfortable listing them in this order; I’ll explain as we dive into the details.

1

In each of these categories, the first principle is to eat only what is food. This may seem obvious, until we realize that non-foods are added to many items in the forms of:

  • MSG
  • fake sweeteners
  • synthetic food colorings
  • hydrogenated fats
  • hydrolyzed proteins
  • propylene glycol (antifreeze)
  • and probably anything you can’t pronounce

An easy way to begin changing from products with these additives is to begin your weekly marketing at a “health food” type store, such as Whole Foods or Trader Joes (my favorite), since they generally carry products made with only food. Wow, what a concept.

2

The second principle is to focus on what you consume the most of, and what is most toxic. That’s where these 12 steps really come into play.

3

The third principle is to begin the switch to whole and properly prepared rather than refined. We hear the term “whole” a lot in relation to food, but not enough emphasis is placed upon proper preparation, which can either enhance or destroy the nutritional value of the food.

I’ll be posting this introduction post in as a page at the top of the page, and then link on each category as I write so you can refer back at your leisure.

Food Makeover

Does your pantry look like this?

(And I’m not talking about crowded or unorganized, but the foods in it.)

And maybe your doctor, or your friend, or your nutritionist, or your conscience has recently told you that you need to change over to healthier eating. But maybe you are overwhelmed?

If so, take heart.

My pantry looked similar to this a few years ago, and I have made significant changes to the pantry and our diet, even as a busy mom with a limited budget. Remember the CleanGreenStart Approach:

  • Start because every change to a healthier product is a step in the right direction
  • Read labels, including ingredients and processing info for food
  • Replace the most toxic products immediately as your budget will allow, but commit to change over the rest as you use up/repurchase them

In the coming weeks (months?) I’ll be adding tips on switching out foods in the “Standard American Diet” (the SAD diet) for healthier choices. And we’ll come back and take a look at this all-too-familiar looking pantry for inspiration.

(This is not my pantry. . . and the owner will remain anonymous. The cute baskets are a great idea, don’t you think? Maybe I’ll “cute up” my pantry a bit and show you what it looks like sans Cheese Nips, etc.)